02. Artists

Camille Blatrix

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b. 1984 in Paris (France), where he lives and works

At once highly personal, funny and enigmatic, Camille Blatrix’s sculptures are a summons to engage with stories awaiting resolution. His narratives, which determine the mode of presentation of his “objects” – a term he insists on – and his choice of carefully wrought materials, suggest a totally new “way of being” for his work.

Winner of the 2014 Ricard Foundation Prize for contemporary art, Blatrix has recently shown at SculptureCenter (New York) and Balice Hertling (Paris).

Oeuvre produite par Lafayette Anticipation - Fonds de dotation Famille Moulin, Paris. 

© DR


Works


La vie moderne

La liberté, l'amour, la vitesse, Création Biennale 2015

At once highly personal, funny and enigmatic, Camille Blatrix’s sculptures are a summons to engage with stories awaiting resolution. His narratives, which determine the mode of presentation of his “objects” – a term he insists on – and his choice of carefully wrought materials, suggest a totally new “way of being” for his work. For the Biennale, Blatrix has created a unique sort of cashpoint machine: it has feelings… and talks to the user about the sadness of the world. The visitor starts a dialogue with a machine, which is futuristically and, at the same time, nostalgically designed, and this starts a dialogue. “I used to have really hard times with cash machines”, the artist tells us. “They were never able to give me what I wanted…” Here we see how a piece of ephemeral technology is suddenly really interested in the people that use it.

Animation en collaboration avec Jeremy Piningre et Clement Goffinet (image), William Jame et PFS (sound design)
Courtesy de l'artiste et Balice Hertling, Paris

Venues : La Sucrière

Getting there



Gallery
Camille Blatrix 2 photos
1/0

© Blaise Adilon

Camille Blatrix
La liberté, l'amour, la vitesse - Création Biennale 2015
La vie moderne | La Sucrière
2/0

© Blaise Adilon

Camille Blatrix
La liberté, l'amour, la vitesse - Création Biennale 2015
La vie moderne | La Sucrière